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Carotenoid consumption linked to lower prostate cancer risk

25-Feb-2005

Lycopene is not the only carotenoid in the diet that appears to protect against prostate cancer, suggests a new study.

Researchers comparing dietary information from 130 prostate cancer patients with 274 cancer-free controls found that risk of prostate cancer declined with increasing consumption of lycopene, as well as alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin.

While the findings confirm results from other studies identifying lycopene as a cancer-fighter, they also point to the anti-cancer activity of several other carotenoids.

 

The team from Curtin University of Technology in Perth, Australia, report that those in the highest quartile of lycopene intake had a greater than 80 per cent reduced risk of the cancer over those in the lowest quartile.

 

The results for beta-cryptoxanthin were almost the same, while the reduced risk was 0.02 for lutein and zeaxanthin, they write in the 1 March issue of the International Journal of Cancer (vol 113, issue 6, pp1010-4).

 

Consumption of foods including tomatoes, spinach and citrus fruits was also associated with a reduced cancer risk.

 

The researchers conclude that the "corresponding dose-response relationships were also significant, suggesting that vegetables and fruits rich in lycopene and other carotenoids may be protective against prostate cancer".

 

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