Take charge of your nutrition and include soy

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Immune system, Cancer, Medicine, Breast cancer

According to a Cornell University medical director, it is essential
for people to be pro-active about nutrition and urges more soy in
diets to help prevent illness and disease.

According to a Cornell University medical director, it's "critically important"​ for people to be pro-active about nutrition and urges more soy in diets to help prevent illness and disease. "Compounds called isoflavones contained in soy may help lower cholesterol, build bone mass, and possibly even prevent the accumulation of brain plaques that lead to Alzheimer's disease, according to a number of recent reports,"​ a Cornell publication, the "Food and Fitness Advisor,"​ says in its September issue. "Soy isoflavones may also have potent effects against breast cancer."​ Dr. Mitchell Gaynor, medical director of the Centre for Complementary and Integrative Medicine at the New York Weill Cornell Medical Centre, said: "One in every 2.5 million Americans at some point in their lives are going to hear the words 'you have cancer',"​ he said. "While there are genetic and environmental factors that cause cancer, a lot of people are not getting enough of the nutrients that nourish the immune system and help other mechanisms that fight cancer."​ The Cornell publication lists 10 diet activities that could, "increase your daily portion of prevention."​ One is to, "include more soy protein in your diet, 25 to 50 grams a day.""Studies have shown that soy can shift the type of oestrogen in a woman's body from the type that predisposes to breast cancer to the type that actually protects against breast cancer,"​ Dr. Gaynor said. The "Food and Fitness Advisor,"​ a publication of the Centre for Women's Healthcare at Weill Medical College of Cornell University, also cited other new research showing that soy can help increase bone mass in women, reduces a protein that contributes to brain plaques in Alzheimer's disease, and lowers cholesterol.

Related topics: Research

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