Fish for fighting depression

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Psychology, Nutrition

Eating more fish could help people suffering from depression,
according to new research to be presented this week, the New
Zealand Dietetic Association said on Tuesday

Eating more fish could help people suffering from depression, according to new research to be presented this week, the New Zealand Dietetic Association said on Tuesday, a German press agency reports this week. Doctor Karen Silvers, a scientist with the Crop and Food Research organization, said New Zealand had one of the highest rates of major depression and lowest levels of per capita fish consumption in the world. "Our research has shown that there is a significant relationship between fish consumption and the self-reported mental health of New Zealanders,"​ she said. She will present research showing that fish could be an effective antidote for depression and other psychiatric illness at the Dietetic Association's annual conference, which opens in Christchurch on Thursday. Doctor Richard Porter, senior lecturer in psychiatry at the Christchurch School of Medicine, will give a lecture on the effects of diet on mood at the conference. He said there was evidence that a component of protein foods called tryptophan, an amino acid essential in the diet of vertebrates, may also help people with depression. "There is some evidence that tryptophan may be a useful anti- depressant,"​ he said. "Also, there have been reports of an improvement in cognitive function in schizophrenia amongst those people following a low- tryptophan diet, although the evidence in this area is less clear."​ Porter said he would present information at the conference on the effect of tryptophan-depleted diets on mood, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. dpa

Related topics: Research

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