Fibre may help reduce cancer risk in larynx

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Nutrition, Epidemiology

New findings confirm the role played by diet in risk for cancer of
the larynx. A team of European researchers found that dietary fibre
was strongly associated with the risk of laryngeal cancer.

New findings confirm the role played by diet in risk for cancer of the larynx. A team of European researchers found that dietary fibre was strongly associated with the risk of laryngeal cancer.

The scientists from the Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche in Milan, Italy, and colleagues based in Switzerland and France noted that consumption of vegetables, fruit and wholegrain cereals has been inversely related to laryngeal cancer risk. However, they wanted to further examine the effects of fibre from each type of food on reducing risk of laryngeal cancer.

A case-control study compared 527 patients with larynx cancer to almost 1300 non-cancer patients. They matched age, sex and study centre, and interviewed the cancer patients on their eating habits.

The inverse association observed was similar among different subsites of laryngeal cancer, and consistent across strata of various covariates.

This study found a strong inverse association between total fibre intake and laryngeal cancer risk, reported the researchers. However when examining each food type, fibre from grains had no significant effect on cancer risk. They suggest this may be because of the quantities of refined grains consumed by the population.

The researchers did not explain how exactly fibre works to reduce the risk of laryngeal cancer. However, they noted that fibre intake may also reflect a healthier diet in general among the people surveyed.

And other lifestyle risk factors, such as smoking and consumption of alcohol, also play a significant role in the cancer risk.

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