Satiety effects of GI and whole foods investigated

By staff reporter

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Nutrition, Carbohydrate

Leatherhead Food International is conducting research into the
satiety effects of Glycaemic Index and whole foods in a year-long
project at its UK premises.

Lead researcher Sarah Hull told NutraIngredients.com the study would compare short and long-chain carbohydrate foods to quantify their effects on "feelings of fullness".​ She said the project was instigated in response to the rise of satiety as a nutrition concept that shared many parallels with Glycaemic Index principles. "But whereas the Glycaemic Index measures blood sugar response to food consumption, we are more interested in gaining a more experiential response from participants in the study,"​ Hull said. "We will be asking them questions about how they feel after they consumer certain foods at certain times to determine their level of satiety."​ The study will comprise two sub-studies - GI foods and whole foods - with both employing a bread matrix using a variety of grains and flours. A control group will consume only water. "We are interested to find out not only how full they feel after each meal occasion but how what they eat affects how much they eat at the next meal,"​ Hull noted. "We have developed an electronic means of asking questions of the participants using pocket PC's so that we can accurately gauge their reaction to the breakfast and lunch meals they will consume." ​Thirty five participants will visit Leatherhead's Surrey HQ three times beginning in July and the results will be published and made available to Leatherhaed members in early 2009. It is also expected the research will be published in peer-review journals. Slow-carb rising fast ​ GI as a nutrition concept rose to prominence in the wake of the low-carb dieting fad that peaked and ebbed in 2002 and 2003. GI, or 'slow carb' as it has been named, promises a more reasoned approach to carbohydrate intake, ranking foods by how quickly they release their sugars into the bloodstream. Low-GI foods are generally those that are low in carbohydrates or consist of long-chain carbohydrates like whole grains and therefore more slowly release their sugars, causing, in theory, a greater feeling of satiety. Many European countries, most notably the UK, have embraced the low-GI idea, with GI products and labelling schemes in place alerting consumers to low- and medium-GI foods. Sweden is the only European country to officially approve a low-GI health claim. Products that qualify according to World Health Organization/Food and Agriculture Organization criteria can state: "(X) gives a low and slow blood sugar response and has a scientifically tested low glycaemic index."

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