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Special edition: Inflammation

Inflammation: The expression of a very modern malady

2 commentsBy Shane Starling , 26-Apr-2011
Last updated on 26-Apr-2011 at 16:06 GMT

Extra-curricular inflammation of the human body is very real and costing healthcare providers billions globally. But where did it come from and are current efforts helping it go away?

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2 comments (Comments are now closed)

Blah blah blah

We've heard all this before. Everyone knows that chronic inflammation (usually representing the failure of an initial acute inflammatory response) drives degenerative disease; and that every pharma and natural products research team is looking at this with beadily commercial eyes.

Anyone in a position to take a less market-orientated view should look at the relationship between ergonomic / dietary shift and the emergence of the multiple pandemics of degenerative diseases that dominate public health today. It was not always thus, and you don't have to go back to Neolithic times to find a nutritional / public health 'golden age.' The mid-Victorian period has been extensively and minutely documented as a lacuna when life expectancy (at age 5) more or less matched our own, and health expectancy vastly exceeded ours. The economic, cultural, technical and nutritional reasons for this are known, and are effectively an up-dating of the McKeown hypothesis.

Medical professionals hate this construct because it fatally undermines their cosy myths of medical modernism, and if put into practice would render most of them irrelevant. They maintain that the historical data must be wrong. Unfortunately for them the historians, who know a good deal more about history and historical research than medics do, have broadly accepted the mid-Victorian case.

Scientists and especially culturally-embedded medical scientists who do not know their history, and as a result do not understand where they come from, can have no clear idea of where they are or where they are going.

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Posted by paul clayton
28 April 2011 | 13h32

Consequences of systemic inflammation

Chronic inflammation contributes significantly to development of chronic diseases. Usually, inflammation is associated with infections or injuries causing serious short-term (spike-type) inflammation as part of body'e response to insults, however, minor inflammation caused by several other factors including overeating results in chronic, long-term inflammation. This is not presented to public effectively enough. Chronic inflammation is a long term health risk. Based on scientific literature, there is a need to present and educate public about consequences of chronic inflammation.
Addressing chronic inflammation (whether minor or major) may have significant role in preventive approach. To follow this approach, low cost diagnostics (or even self-diagnostic) may help to increase awareness about inflammation and about efficacy of anti-inflammatory products.

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Posted by Zb J Pietrzkowski
27 April 2011 | 18h12

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