Apples and wine reduce risk of asthma

- Last updated on GMT

In a recent study published in the American Journal of Respiratory
and Critical Care Medicine, researchers from London's King's
College reported that individuals who ate at least two apples per
week were between 22 and 32 percent less likely to develop asthma
than people who ate fewer apples.

In a recent study published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, researchers from London's King's College reported that individuals who ate at least two apples per week were between 22 and 32 percent less likely to develop asthma than people who ate fewer apples.

The study examined the role of antioxidants in lung health. Dietary consumption was compared to asthma risk and severity in 1,471 adults in the United Kingdom (UK). Apple consumption was correlated with reduced risks of asthma incidence. Red wine intake, additionally, was associated with reduced asthma severity. Researchers also found that the antioxidant selenium, a trace mineral, tended to reduce asthma risks.

The authors hinted that flavonoids, phytonutrients found in both apples and red wine, may be responsible for the reduction in asthma inflammation.

Previous research has supported the relationship between apple consumption and lung health. Earlier this year, researchers at the University of Nottingham found that apple eaters had a lower risk of developing respiratory disease than people who did not consume the fruit.

While the mechanisms behind these associations remain unclear, the relationship between plant foods containing flavonoids and lung health is repeatedly supported by well controlled scientific research.

Related topics: Research

Follow us

Featured Events

View more

Products

View more

Webinars