BHF backs vitamin K heart health research

By Shane Starling

- Last updated on GMT

© iStock
© iStock

Related tags: Blood vessel

The British Heart Foundation (BHF) has invested £290,000 (€365,000) in a vitamin K trial investigating its potential to reduce heart problems in people with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

The University of Dundee and University of Glasgow in Scotland are looking at the potential of vitamin K to reduce blood vessel calcium build up that is common in those with kidney disease, and which can provoke heart attacks and strokes.

The study is comprised of 166 CKD sufferers who will be given either 400 micrograms of vitamin K or placebo.

“This BHF-funded trial will test whether a simple treatment, vitamin K supplementation, can reduce the development of arterial stiffness – an early sign of cardiovascular risk,”​ said professor Jeremy Pearson, BHF associate medical director.

If successful, it will pave the way for a large scale trial to find out whether vitamin K supplementation reduces cardiovascular events in CKD patients and therefore should become part of routine treatment.”

About a third of over-65s have CKD in the UK.

Related news

Show more

Related products

show more

20 Years Palm Tocotrienols Brain Health Research

20 Years Palm Tocotrienols Brain Health Research

ExcelVite Sdn. Bhd. | 25-Sep-2019 | Technical / White Paper

Research of Vitamin E tocotrienol in brain health and neuroprotection began twenty years ago.
Today, other health benefits have been discovered...

Robertet doubles Lipowheat™ production

Robertet doubles Lipowheat™ production

Robertet Health & Beauty | 19-Sep-2019 | Technical / White Paper

Robertet is investing into a new production unit on its historical industrial site based in Grasse. This new unit will support the continuing growing demand...

Related suppliers

1 comment

Choose the right K

Posted by J. H. Berthelsen,

Vitamin K2 is probably the best K for this purpose.

Report abuse

Follow us

Featured Events

View more

Products

View more

Webinars