Magnesium right on time as role in body rhythms is recognised

By Will Chu

- Last updated on GMT

With this discovery, circadian rhythms, hormone release, body temperature and other important bodily functions in people could be an area worth exploring. (© iStock.com)
With this discovery, circadian rhythms, hormone release, body temperature and other important bodily functions in people could be an area worth exploring. (© iStock.com)

Related tags: Dna, Metabolism

The amount of magnesium in the diet plays a central role in helping to adapt to the rhythms of night and day, researchers have discovered.

The revelation may also point towards magnesium as a gatekeeper of cellular energy balance and expenditure over the daily cycle.

The study pinpointed the nutrient magnesium as a determinant of how cells keep to a schedule helping them adjust to the natural environmental cycle of day and night​,​ also known as circadian rhythms.

With this discovery, a new direction of research involving circadian rhythms hormone release, body temperature and other important bodily functions in people is possible.

What scientists don’t know is how the relevant genes initiate biochemical mechanisms that enable the circadian regulation of cell biology.

Human cells, algae & fungi

wheat crop farming agriculture grain
Study findings could lead to the development of new crop varieties with increased yields or adjustable harvesting seasons.(© iStock.com)

That was the objective for researchers at the University of Edinburgh and the MRC Laboratory for Molecular Biology in Cambridge.

The team began with experiments with human cells, algae, and fungi. In all test subjects, the levels of magnesium increased and decreased in line with the day’s daily cycle.

Magnesium levels were also linked with the rate of metabolism in cells. The researchers predicted that the cells ability to convert nutrients into energy would be low when magnesium levels were low as protein synthesis is one of the most energetically expensive processes that cells undertake.

"Although the clinical relevance of magnesium in various tissues is beginning to garner more attention, how magnesium regulates our body's internal clock and metabolism has simply not been considered before,”​ said senior author, Dr John O'Neill of the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge.

“The new discovery could lead to a whole range of benefits spanning human health to agricultural productivity."

Mechanisms of action

red algae seaweed shakzu
The researchers noted that that the magnesium rhythms observed in the algae occur in constant darkness. (© iStock.com)

In trying to explain their observations, the team believed that the data supported a model where the cells specifically controlled the magnesium transporters in the plasma membrane that corresponded to the rhythmic magnesium changes.

These changes dictated the energy demands and protein production of human cells during the day, as well as the decreased energy production in photosynthetic cells at night.

Equally, the magnesium levels were controlled within a feedback loop that was able to regulate the genes controlling the rhythms.

The team believed the feedback loop was acting as a ‘meta-regulator’ to include metabolic rhythms and other feedback models that were involved in cellular timekeeping.

The researchers noted that that the magnesium rhythms observed in the algae occur in constant darkness​.​ They thought that it might be due to an uncharacterised non-transcriptional clock mechanism​ that also drives certain rhythms in inactive algae cells.

"Internal clocks are fundamental to all living things. They influence many aspects of health and disease in our own bodies, but equally in crop plants and micro-organisms,” ​said Dr Gerben van Ooijen, of the University of Edinburgh's School of Biological Sciences, who also led the study.

It is now essential to find out how these fundamentally novel observations translate to whole tissue or organisms, to make us better equipped to influence them in complex organisms for future medical and agricultural purposes."

Source: Nature

Published online ahead of print, doi:10.1038/nature17407

“Daily magnesium fluxes regulate cellular timekeeping and energy balance.”

Authors: Kevin A. Feeney, Louise L. Hansen, Marrit Putker, Consuelo Olivares-Yañez, Jason Day, Lorna Eades, Luis Larrondo, Nathaniel P. Hoyle, John S. O’Neill & Gerben van Ooijen.

Related news

Show more

Related products

show more

Robuvit

Introducing Robuvit® For Premium Vitality

Horphag Research (USA) Inc. | 05-Apr-2018 | Clinical Study

Horphag Research launches Robuvit®, a French oak extract that is a caffeine-free natural energizer and supports sports performance. Published research...

Omegavie® DHA algae Capsules

Omegavie® DHA algae Capsules

POLARIS | 05-Mar-2018 | Application Note

Omegavie® DHA algae capsules is a real opportunity to consume high-performing Omega-3 DHA 100% vegan, natural, sustainable, GMO- and allergen-free. Designed...

Highly bioavailable and stable source of iron

Highly bioavailable and stable source of iron

Lipofoods, a Lubrizol Company | 28-Feb-2018 | Infographic

LIPOFER™ is a water-dispersible micronized source of iron that has been microencapsulated to boost iron absorption and reduce unwanted organoleptic characteristics....

Related suppliers

Follow us

Featured Events

View more

Products

View more

Webinars