Vitamin E supplementation can improve hormonal, metabolic parameters in PCOS patients – systematic review and meta-analysis

By Nurul Ain Razali contact

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Vitamin E supplementation can positively affect polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients’ metabolic and hormonal parameters. © Getty Images
Vitamin E supplementation can positively affect polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients’ metabolic and hormonal parameters. © Getty Images

Related tags: PCOS, Vitamin e, endocrinology, risk factors

Vitamin E supplementation can positively affect polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients’ metabolic and hormonal parameters, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis.

For instance, it  can decrease testosterone and luteinising hormone (LH) levels and increase progesterone and follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) levels.

It can also reduce insulin resistance and cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride (TG) levels.

The study titled Effect of vitamin E supplementation on cardiometabolic risk factors, inflammatory and oxidative markers and hormonal functions in PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome): a systematic review and meta‐analysis​ was published in the journal Scientific Reports​.

“PCOS is a common endocrinopathy among reproductive-age women. PCOS is associated with a variety of metabolic conditions, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hypertension, dyslipidemia, CVD, and atherosclerosis.

“Various therapeutical approaches are currently used to manage or control symptoms associated with PCOS.

“This systematic review intended to assess the effects of Vit E supplementation on cardiometabolic risk factors, inflammatory and oxidative markers, and hormonal functions in PCOS women based on the clinical trial results,”​ said the team.

Utilising the PRISMA guideline, the researchers scoured databases like PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science (WoS) and Embase to retrieve 359 clinical studies evaluating the effects of vitamin E regimens on cardiometabolic risk factors, inflammatory and oxidative markers, and hormonal functions compared to placebo groups. The subjects were aged 18 and above and strictly facing PCOS and receiving vitamin E supplementation alongside a placebo group.

A total of 12 studies involving RCTs were filtered from 359 papers for this meta-analysis.

Findings

Out of the 12 studies, four evaluated testosterone levels pre- and post-vitamin co-supplementation. Results showed a significant decrease in the hormone between the intervention and control groups.

Seven studies highlighted vitamin E’s impact on BMI, but only two studies showed a small decrease in the index following vitamin E and CoQ10 supplementation. Weight changes were not significant.

Three studies showed “promising results” on the HOMA score and insulin level changes on insulin resistance parameters. However, vitamin E supplementation alone did not have a similar impact.

Based on the results, vitamin E supplementation can decrease testosterone and LH levels, whereas it increases progesterone and FSH levels.

However, studies have not demonstrated a significant change in estradiol and DHEAS levels following vitamin E co-supplementation. A study by A. Ciji et al.​ reported the effects of vitamin E supplementation to reverse oxidant agents’ impact on steroid hormones, such as testosterone and estradiol.

Insulin resistance is known to play a critical role in many PCOS co-morbidities. A study by Cussons AJ et al.​ reported that insulin resistance and obesity could lead to ventricular and endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis.

“We found that supplementary regimens containing vitamin E can positively affect the patients diagnosed with PCOS with regards to metabolic and hormonal parameters.

“More studies are needed to evaluate the effects of vitamin E supplementation in different ethnicities and age groups.

“Other studies that assess the effects of vitamin E supplementation in both vitamin E-sufficient and -deficient populations will add to the current knowledge about the role of vitamin E supplementary regimens in PCOS,”​ said the researchers.

Source:​ Scientific Reports

“Effect of vitamin E supplementation on cardiometabolic risk factors, inflammatory and oxidative markers and hormonal functions in PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome): a systematic review and meta‐analysis.”

DOI:​ 10.1038/s41598-022-09082-3

Authors: ​Ghazale Tefagh et al

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